Book Review: We All Fall Down by Nic Sheff

Summary:
In his bestselling memoir Tweak, Nic Sheff shared a heartbreakingly honest account of his days as a crystal meth addict. In this powerful and engrossing follow-up, Sheff writes candidly about stints at in-patient rehabilitation facilities, devastating relapses with alcohol and drugs, and hard-won realizations about what it means to be a young person living with addiction.

Nic Sheff is the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling memoir Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines.

Review: 

I've wanted to read one of Nic Sheff's memoirs since I saw him on Oprah with his dad.  It was right around the time Tweak came out, because his dad was there talking about his own memoir called Beautiful Boy. 
 
This book is not for the easily offended.  It is an honest account of an addict's life: complete with relapses, bad language (mostly the f-word) and sexual situations.  Nic tells it like it is, which is what makes this book so powerful and moving.  You are right there with him as he's going through differnet situations: rehab, relapsing, family drama, relationship troubles, getting clean, and finding balance. 
 
I found We All Fall Down hard to read at times, just because the things Nic goes through are so sad.  There's no way I would have given up on the book though.  It was too good and I had to keep reading to find out what happens to Nic.  If you've ever wondered what an addict is thinking, or what drives them to use, you should read We All Fall Down.  Parents could use the book as a cautionary tale for teens as well.  Drug use is in no way romanticized, but parents should read the book first before letting their children read it.  I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction, and I really enjoyed this book so I think that says a lot about the quality of the writing and the poignancy of the story.

Just One Gripe:
Some of the writing is conversational.  It makes the book feel more real but I found myself slowing down at times to really get the full meaning and tone of what Nic was conveying.

The Best Thing About This Book:
The honesty.

Appropriate for a younger audience:
Hmm.  Parents should most definitely read it first.

Score:


4 comments:

  1. This sounds so powerful - I'm not sure it's my normal cup of tea, but every now and again it's good to step out of my comfort zone. Excellent review :)

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  2. Definitely going to check this one out. Thanks for the review!

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  3. This sounds really interesting. I haven't heard anything about this author, so I'm going to have to check it out. Great review and thanks for posting it!

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  4. HI, I appreciate your review. Is there anyway you could email me? lfwhittle@gmail.com - I would like to further inquiry about your review and have a few questions.
    Regards

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